Colombia government, rebels seek U.S. involvement in peace talks

The talks are an initiative by President Gustavo Petro, who in August became Colombia's first-ever leftist leader and has vowed a less bellicose approach to ending violence

November 26, 2022 07:58 am | Updated 07:58 am IST - Caracas

Colombia's government and the National Liberation Army (ELN), the last recognized rebel group in the country, said on Friday they would invite the United States to join their peace process.

The talks are an initiative by President Gustavo Petro, who in August became Colombia's first-ever leftist leader and has vowed a less bellicose approach to ending violence wrought by armed groups, including leftist guerrillas and drug traffickers.

The parties resumed formal talks in Venezuela on Monday for the first time since 2019.

They agreed to reach out to the United States via diplomatic channels "to find out its willingness to participate in the process" and send a special envoy, according to a statement from Norway, one of the guarantors of the talks.

The statement said the talks had taken place in an environment of "trust and optimism."

When asked by AFP, the U.S. State Department did not confirm any eventual involvement in the talks by the United States.

"At this point we continue to engage the Petro administration to better understand plans to seek a total peace with the ELN, FARC dissidents, and other criminal organizations," a State Department spokesperson told AFP, referring to the remaining still-armed members of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia rebel group, which subsequently laid down weapons and created a political party.

"The ELN remains a designated Foreign Terrorist Organization under US law," they added.

The parties also agreed to invite Brazil, Chile, and Mexico to join Norway, Cuba, and Venezuela as guarantors of the process.

Mexico agreed to take part in the talks during Petro's visit Friday with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, according to a government statement.

The two leaders discussed their "conviction to work together for peace in the region," the statement said.

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